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AirCrete

Posted by Jessica Richardson on

From dome homes with an artistic feel, to just about everything else you can think of, AirCrete is becoming the best solution for many DIY home builders and even some construction companies. 

Here is Everything You Need To Know About AirCrete

What is AirCrete?

In simple terms AirCrete is aerated concrete. Unlike traditional cinder blocks or concrete bricks, which have a high cost, heavy weight and are not ideal to make yourself or build a home with yourself. AirCrete blocks extend your concrete by a very large margin, reducing cost, making blocks lightweight, easy to work with and allowing DIY home possible. 

But why stop there, the benefits are some of the most important aspects to AirCrete. 

  • Fire Resistant 
  • Thermal Insulation 
  • Acoustic Insulation
  • Faster Construction 
  • Structural Performance 
  • Lightweight 
  • Sustainable
  • DIY building possible  


Everything AirCrete

Does it really save you money?

Yes, it really does. This can be very difficult to calculate outright because of thickness, dimensions, type of home and material used but here is a basic idea.

Cinder block cost for 1000 sq ft build.
Average of $11 per sq ft x 1000 sq ft = $11,000 Total

AirCrete block cost for 1000 sq ft build.
Average of $4 per sq ft x 1000 sq ft = $4,000 Total

This can really change greatly, where you get your materials, do you buy or make the blocks yourself and so many other aspects. So take this as a grain of salt and research your own projects cost accordingly.

The cost of labor and materials needed can be the real savings. Given the weight of an AirCrete block is about 80% lighter, a child can easily carry one. Meaning moving one block up higher on a building wouldn't take lifts or machinery. A simple rope could pull one up easily, or even carrying it up a ramp with ease.

Also for DIY blocks, your investment in tools to make the AirCrete blocks vs. Cinderblocks is a big difference as well. 

What can I build with it, what are AirCrete Molds and what's the truth about how strong it is?

While many websites will tell you it's limited and not as strong, it all really depends on how the blocks or panels are made. You will typically hear about dome homes, small cheap projects and sticking to only appropriate uses the AirCrete. While this is true in some regards, not all AirCrete is the same. 

If you are building the blocks yourself and making a small dome, slab, little home additions to keep prices low, you should stick to some basic rules on what to use the AirCrete for, also conditions it might not be right for. But something that is not really known here in the United States is how other countries having been using AirCrete for a long time. For very large and beautiful homes.

Would you expect a home like this to be made from AirCrete? Well it is...

 

So it's a complicated subject when it comes to strength and use. Some are backyard low cost aerated bricks using dish soap. While some are fortified with fibers and very special aerated chemicals. Obviously, this makes it complicated as well with what you can build. But lets just say if you have a vision from a dome home or the home pictured above, many things are possible with AirCrete. 

One of the exciting things about AirCrete is the mold options. Imagine making a mold of a large pillar that is spiraled. You can simply pour the AirCrete into the mold and wait for it to dry. Depending on the size, you can also carry it after. This gives a lot of creative options to the DIY AirCrete builder.

What is an AirCrete DIY Dome Home and How is AirCrete Made?

For the sake of not getting into the professional home construction crew builds. This will be a guide for DIY dome homes and mixing it yourself. While these shouldn't be used as a complete guide to start tomorrow. It's best to read up, watch videos or even attend a workshop. But here are some good videos that can explain the basics.

DIY Dome AirCrete Homes


 
Basics on how to make AirCrete blocks

 

So why isn't AirCrete being used all the time?


Actually it is, Europe and Asia AirCrete homes are very common and even more so now. But they have been used for ages in Europe at the same time. The issue is the United State is slow to catching on, also getting permits can be hard. This is because county and city building department don't exactly understand it well enough. While some don't even know what it is still. 

The use and commonality of wood homes in the United States actually dates back quite far. While Americans came from all over the world, the pilgrims were originally from the United Kingdom. At one point the United Kingdom was covered in forests with an abundance of wood. This made it the primary material for home building and carried over to the United States. However, the forests were depleted in the UK shortly after. Making concrete the only source available to build homes after that. 

They still saw that America had a huge amount of forests and pine trees however. The rush to build homes came and the lumber industry took off. Craftsman homes were sold cheaply and almost every home was constructed of wood. That doesn't make it better though, it rots, doesn't last long without maintenance, subject to termites, water damage and can catch on fire easily. But, it's just the traditional way to build and that doesn't look to be changing anytime soon. 

Can I use and build a home legally Using AirCrete?

It really all depends on the country, city and county. It's especially not understood in the United States. But rural places often are excited to try new things, it totally depends on if you can get a permit for it. It's best to look into this before you waste the money to build, then your home is deemed unlivable because they don't understand what it is. This really goes for all countries, make sure to check first. 

Another thing to note is AirCrete panels and blocks are limited in the United States. Meaning depending where you live, the only place to buy them in bulk might be many states away. This would drive the cost up and might make it unreasonable for large home builds. But if the plan is to make your own AirCrete, then there wouldn't be a problem. 


Are you excited about the possibilities of AirCrete?

It's a fun subject to end this article with, as a company we love this stuff because the land we offer is cheap. Sometimes our land is in AirCrete approved areas, you can buy the land and build a home for under $50k easy. Then live mortgage free and enjoy your life without money stress or even rent the place out.

But what else? Well think about living in another country or moving to Hawaii. Some of us have a life long dream to design and construct a home. Camping in a trailer, waking up, getting coffee and putting in a days work each day to build your new home. AirCrete makes this possible for once, you can do it yourself, with your family or a few friends. The design options are endless with this stuff, you can pour it into unusual molds and also cut the bricks by hand into shapes.  

Even more thrilling, building a small tract for AirBnb, hostel or even a hotel. I didn't want to throw myself into this article, but it's a personal dream of mine. Having lived in Costa Rica for a while. I can picture 4 to 6 well designed artistic small dome homes with patios. Then an office dome home for check-ins, a nice pool, small restaurant for breakfast and offering local tours from nearby guides. Interestingly, AirBnb found that unique homes get booked more for the experience outside of peoples daily living. These are no different, I'm quite sure these would book out after getting noticed by travelers and getting good reviews. With websites like TripAdvisor, AirBnb, Expedia and many more. Now is a better time then every for such a project.

Well that's my dream, what is yours?

Useful Links

Domegaia -For AirCrete workshops worldwide, building plans and tools. 
Hebel - One of the few places to buy AirCrete in America and build large homes.
Tiny Giant Life - AirCrete Cost Calculator 

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